How did London look in 1666?

London was a busy city in 1666. It was very crowded. The streets were narrow and dusty. The houses were made of wood and very close together.

What did houses in London look like in 1666?

The houses in London in 1666 were mainly made of wood and had thatched roofs. The floors were covered in straw. The houses were built very close together and this helped the fire to spread from house to house.

What did London look like after the Great Fire of London?

A quarter of London was destroyed in the fire, which began on 2 September 1666. Within five days around 13,200 houses were in ruins and an estimated 100,000 Londoners were homeless. … In other words, up to eight years after the fire, some Londoners were still living in these shanty towns, their old homes not yet rebuilt.

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What was London like before the Great Fire of London?

About 350,000 people lived in London just before the Great Fire, it was one of the largest cities in Europe. Homes arched out over the street below, almost touching in places, and the city was buzzing with people.

What was London like in 1600?

The city was very crowded, and living conditions were sometimes very dirty. There wasn’t any way to wash up properly as the river was dirty too, yet people still bathed and washed their clothes there – so, it was easy for people get sick.

What is the oldest London landmark?

The White Tower is the oldest part of the famed Tower of London, and it’s actually the oldest intact building in London. It was the first bit of the tower to be built by William the Conqueror, partly to subdue Londoners. It’s said that Guy Fawkes was interrogated in the basement.

How did London cope with the plague?

The poorest people remained in London with the rats and those people who had the plague. Watchmen locked and kept guard over infected houses. … Searchers looked for dead bodies and took them at night to plague pits for burial. All trade with London and other plague towns was stopped.

What started the fire of London?

The fire started at 1am on Sunday morning in Thomas Farriner’s bakery on Pudding Lane. It may have been caused by a spark from his oven falling onto a pile of fuel nearby. The fire spread easily because London was very dry after a long, hot summer.

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What good came from the Great Fire of London?

The Great Fire incinerated a medieval city and left 50,000 people temporarily homeless, but in its place a new London was built; a London which, though abundant with guilds, churches and a splendid new St Paul’s Cathedral, was an urban home fit for a major international trading centre.

Who was blamed for the Great Fire of London?

French watchmaker Robert Hubert confessed to starting the blaze and was hanged on October 27, 1666. Years later it was revealed he was at sea when the fire began, and could not have been responsible. There were other scapegoats, including people of Catholic faith and from overseas.

Did the Great Fire of London wipe out the plague?

In 1666 the Great Fire of London destroyed much of the centre of London, but also helped to kill off some of the black rats and fleas that carried the plague bacillus. … In June 6137 people died, in July 17036 people and at its peak in August, 31159 people died.

Did London Bridge burn down?

Boudica and the Iceni razed the city to the ground in 60AD and there were the two notable fires in 675 and 989. … St Paul’s Cathedral was burnt to the ground during the fire of 1087. In 1135 London Bridge was destroyed by flames and was rebuilt in stone.

Does Pudding Lane still exist?

Today Pudding Lane in the City of London is a fairly unexciting little street but there’s still a plaque marking the spot where the fire began – or at least ‘near this site’.

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What was London called before the Romans?

Fast-forward to the 8th century and Alfred the Great took over the dilapidated, formerly Roman town and anglicized the name to Lundenburh, which eventually got shortened to London.

Why did the plague spread so quickly in London?

Towns and cities were highly crowded, with poor sanitation. In London the Thames was heavily polluted, people lived in cramped conditions with sewage and filth in the street. Rats ran rampant, leaving every opportunity for the virus to spread.

What was the reason for the growth in London in 1800 and 1900?

People. London’s population grew at a phenomenal rate. It was one million at the time of the first census in 1801; it had more than doubled half a century later and was over seven million by 1911. Much of this growth was the result of people migrating to the metropolis looking for work.

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